Master of Science in Nursing Schools and Programs

What You Can Do with a Master’s of Science in Nursing

Nurses with a master's of nursing degree are called advanced practice nurses. Four nursing careers require a master's degree:
  • Clinical nurse specialists: They provide direct care to patients and give expert consultations in a chosen nursing specialty, like psychiatric-mental health.
  • Nurse anesthetists: They give anesthesia or similar care to patients both before and after procedures. They also take care of a patients' pain management and emergency services, like airway management.
  • Nurse-midwives: These nurses perform gynecological duties such as exams, prenatal, and neonatal care. They assist during labor and delivery and advice patients regarding family planning.
  • Nurse practitioners: Similar to primary care providers, these nurses perform nursing duties but also offer health care services. Nurse practitioners specialize in a particular field of medicine, such as family practice, acute care, or women's health.
Advanced practice nurses can prescribe medications and are in high demand.

How to Get a Master’s of Science in Nursing

If you already have bachelors of Science in nursing (BSN), you can enroll in a two-year master of science in nursing (MSN) program. You can also apply to MSN programs if you have a bachelor's degree (or higher) in another field. If you are already working as a registered nurse, but do not have a BSN, you can take an accelerated master of science in nursing program known as RN to MSN. This program lasts three to four years if you study full-time. Upon graduation, you receive both your BSN and MSN.

Can Someone with a Master of Science in Nursing Earn More Money?

Registered nurses earned a median salary of $63,7500 annually, but advanced practice nurses are at the pinnacle of the nursing field. The top 10 percent of registered nurses earned more than $93,700 in 2009.

Nursing and Health Care Schools

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